Heirloom Quality Custom Knives

Blade Steels We Use

A2 High Carbon Steel

custom knife blade
A2 High Carbon Steel Blade Parkerized

A2 is an air hardening, cold work, tool steel. A 5% Chromium steel which provides high hardness after heat treatment with good dimensional stability. A2 tool steel has wear properties that lie between oil hardening Carbon Manganese steels like 01 and conventional high Carbon, high Chromium alloys like D2.


D2 High Carbon Steel

Custom meat cleaver
Hollow Ground Cleaver with D2 High Carbon Steel Blade

D2 steel is an air hardening, high-carbon, high-chromium tool steel. It has high wear and abrasion resistant properties. It is heat treatable and will offer a hardness in the range 55-62 HRC, and is machinable in the annealed condition. D2 steel shows little distortion on correct hardening. D2 steel’s high chromium content gives it mild corrosion resisting properties in the hardened condition.


154CM Stainless Blade Steel

custom knife bob loveless style
154CM Stainless Blade Mirror Polished

154CM steel is one of “better” steel varieties made for cutlery and other knife blades. It’s not a powder steel (CPM154 would be the powder version), but it’s a commonly used steel for a higher grade knife.  It has an exceptionally good balance between three enviable attributes which are toughness, hardness and corrosion-resistance.


CPM 154 Powdered Metal Stainless Blade Steel

Loveless style custom knife
Loveless Style Drop Point Hunter with CPM154 Stainless Blade Mirror Polished

CPM 154 is the CPM manufactured version of Crucible’s standard 154 CM. The CPM manufacturing process produces a uniform distribution of the carbides in this grade, giving this CPM 154 easier grinding and polishing, plus better toughness, than conventional 154 CM, while retaining similar heat treat response and wear properties. CPM 154 offers better corrosion resistance, better wear resistance and better hot-hardness than 440C, plus higher toughness. For knifemakers, if offers better edge retention and chipping resistance than 440C.


Damasteel® Stainless Damascus Blade Steel

handmade slipjoint
Slipjoint Folder with Damasteel® Blade and Spring Hugin Pattern

Damasteel® is the best performing stainless Damascus patterned steel in the world. Offering several very attractive patterns.

Damasteel®  is trademarked as well as patented powder steel process of making damascus steel.  Damasteel®  (also the name of the company) is located in Söderfors, Sweden, a village with a long history of forging damascus steel.


Exotic Handle Examples

Ancient Kauri Wood

custom knife loveless style drop point hunter
Loveless Style Drop Point Hunter with Ancient Kauri Handle

Ancient Kauri is a unique material with an amazing beauty and intriguing history.  It is commonly regarded as the oldest wood available in the world. Ancient Kauri has been buried underground in New Zealand for approximately 50,000 years (carbon dated), yet it is as workable as newly-harvested wood.

The Ancient Kauri has a powerful beauty. The grain and tones of the wood are lovely, and it has a powerful shimmering iridescence.  The glow of Ancient Kauri adds to its beauty and illustrates that this is no ordinary timber, but something quite special.  It makes anything built from Ancient Kauri more like a jewel. It is perfect for projects that require an extraordinary material.

Recovery of Ancient Kauri in New Zealand

It is rare to find an exotic material that is made available through environmentally friendly methods.  Ancient Kauri is the most exotic wood in the world, it’s an extremely old growth timber, but not one tree was cut down to harvest it.  All the trees  fell thousands of years ago by natural forces, and one certainty is that there is a very limited amount of Ancient Kauri on the planet.

Wolly Mammoth Ivory

Stainless Damascus Chef’s Knife with Wolly Mammoth Ivory Handle

Mammoth ivory is anywhere from 10,000 to 200,000 years old and is found in Arctic regions such as Alaska, Canada, Chukotka (or the Chuckchi Penninsula), Yakutia, Magadan and Siberia where the tusks have been preserved in the permafrost. These massive tusks are unearthed many ways; modern day gold miners dredge up mineralized remains in the course of placer mining activities, spring floods wash tusks from frozen river banks, bush pilots spot the huge tusks jutting out of the tundra, and Eskimo subsistence hunters find mammoth remains incidentally in their daily task of survival.

2 Comments Add yours

  1. steveknife says:

    Good information!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. jerrywsmithusa says:

      Thanks Steve!

      Like

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